Skip to main content

Prison healthcare possibly the most important setting for improving quality and access – 22 February 2024

By Previous Seminars

Presenter

Dr Laura Sheard

Associate Professor, University of York
Honorary Principal Research Fellow, Bradford Institute for Health Research

Abstract

The quality and safety of healthcare in prisons in the UK has had relatively little attention paid to it, in contrast with the abundance of research on these topics in the hospital environment. Prison based medicine is often viewed as a Cinderella area of healthcare provision; largely hidden away from public scrutiny whilst being an underfunded, undervalued and an unattractive sector for healthcare professionals to work in with a high number of complex patients living in overcrowded conditions. Only a few studies have examined everyday primary care provision in prisons (for example, asthma, diabetes or high blood pressure). Yet, the prison setting represents a unique opportunity to intervene and improve the healthcare trajectories of some of the most marginalised people in society.

In this presentation, Laura spoke about the importance of prison healthcare, how it can be improved and she is passionate about this topic. Laura drew on her own experience of the four years she worked in HMP Leeds alongside findings from several mixed methods studies she led in particular “Qual-P” which focused on understanding and improving the quality of and access to everyday primary care in prisons in the North of England.

A large part of the presentation discussed the major factors which influence the quality of primary care. These are: chronic understaffing; high variability of quality between sites, little to no quality measurement; excessive Did Not Attend rate; community-prison interface incompatibility including IT systems and opioid prescribing; facilitative relationships between healthcare staff and patients.

Presentation

Safety strategies for today and tomorrow – Wednesday 10 January 2024

By Previous Seminars

Presenter

Professor Charles Vincent

Role and organisation

Professor Charles Vincent is an Emeritus Fellow of Jesus College and Professor of Psychology at the University of Oxford.

Abstract

The most prominent and effective patient safety interventions have been targeted at the reliability of basic processes and largely followed a quality improvement model.  There are however many other ways of improving safety.  Effective intervention requires a portfolio of strategies which can be customised to different healthcare contexts. There are five main families of strategies are the best practice quality improvement approach; broader system interventions; risk control; improving the capacity to adapt, monitor and respond and finally mitigation.  The five families can be broadly split into strategies which improve overall quality and safety and those which are primarily aimed at managing risk. These longer-term strategies need to be complemented by short term safety strategies to manage pressures and rapid change, which can be achieved by flexing resources, prioritisation and adaptive teamwork and leadership.  The effective management of risk requires a broad portfolio of both short and long-term strategies which can be customised to different problems and different contexts.

Webinar link

Understanding how unprofessional behaviours between staff in acute care arise, whom they impact, and how they can be addressed: findings from a realist review – 15 November 2023

By Previous Seminars

Presenter

Dr Justin Aunger, Research Fellow, Midlands Patient Safety Research Collaboration

Abstract

Unprofessional behaviour (UB) between staff encompasses various behaviours, including incivility, microaggressions, harassment, and bullying. It is pervasive in acute health care settings and disproportionately impacts minoritised staff. UB has detrimental effects on staff wellbeing, patient safety, and organisational resources. While interventions have been implemented to mitigate UB, there remains limited understanding of how and why they may work and for whom. Similarly, while contributors to these behaviours have been investigated, understanding of how they interact and how they can be targeted by interventions can be improved. To address these knowledge gaps, we performed a realist review, drawing on 148 literature sources and 42 reports of interventions, to better understand how these contributors lead to UB and worsening of its impacts. We also investigated when and how these complex, context-dependent interventions to reduce UB work. This presentation will explore our findings and present implementation guidance to help others address UB in the healthcare workplace in the future.

Biography

Dr. Justin Aunger is a researcher with a background in behavioural science applied at individual, team, and organisational levels. He is interested in addressing complex challenges in healthcare organisations and has recently worked on multiple projects drawing on realist methodology. This includes understanding how inter-organisational collaborations work, and how unprofessional behaviours between staff can be addressed. He has experience developing and delivering multiple kinds of research, including behaviour change interventions in a healthcare context, realist reviews and evaluations, and qualitative studies.

 Webinar link

JOURNAL ARTICLE

By Publications

Ford DM, Budworth L, Lawton R, Teale EA, O’Connor DB. In-hospital stress and patient outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLOS ONE. 2023 Mar 9;18(3). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0282789

 

 

JOURNAL ARTICLE

By Publications

Wilson CM, Janes G, Lawton R, Benn J. Types and effects of feedback for emergency ambulance staff: a systematic mixed studies review and meta-analysis 2023. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2022-015634.

 

TEST BLOG