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Lucy Chapman

JOURNAL ARTICLE

By Publications

Vogt, K. S., Grange, A., Johnson, J., Marran, J., Budworth, L., Coleman, R., & Ellis, R. S. (2022). Study protocol for the online adaptation and evaluation of the ‘ Reboot ’ ( Recovery- boosting ) coaching programme , to prepare critical care nurses for , and aid recovery after , stressful clinical events. Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-022-01014-2

HEALTH INEQUALITIES AND PATIENT SAFETY: Dr Cian Wade, National Medical Director’s Clinical Fellow at NHS England and NHS Improvement and the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, 22 July 2021

By Previous Seminars

Abstract:

Health inequalities are increasing in the UK and the COVID-19 pandemic has provided renewed impetus to find solutions to these unfair and avoidable differences in our population’s health. In addition to addressing the social determinants of health, we must also consider whether elements of healthcare itself systematically disadvantage vulnerable groups of patients. The National Patient Safety Team has set out its strategic objectives to understand whether differences in risk of harm from healthcare are a contributing factor to health inequalities.

Here we presented the findings of a mixed-methods review exploring whether risk of harm from healthcare varies between different groups of patients, what the mechanisms driving these differences are, and what possible solutions may be able to reduce these inequalities. This presents an integration of the patient safety and health inequalities agendas, which offers a novel perspective on the possible role healthcare professionals, organisations and systems could play in both improving patient safety and reducing health inequalities.

 

EVOLVING PATIENT SAFETY: Matt Fogarty, NHS England and NHS Improvement national patient safety team, 20 May 2021

By Previous Seminars

Abstract:

The seminar will discuss some key aspects of our changing understanding of, and approach to, patient safety in the NHS. Discussion points will include our approach to the role of individuals and systems in patient safety incidents, the importance of culture and the need to ensure our approach to learning from incidents is based on a good understanding of error theory. These issues will be presented in the context of the NHS Patient Safety Strategy and how some of the key components of the Strategy link to our evolving understanding of the topic.

Biography:

Matt is currently Deputy Director of Patient Safety (Policy and Strategy) for the national NHS Patient Safety team. Prior to this Matt held a number of roles as a Civil Servant, including as a Private Secretary to the Minister of State for Health. Before joining the Civil Service, Matt was a research scientist and gained his PhD in Developmental Neuroscience at University College London in 2006.

 

KNOWLEDGE BROKERING TO GET EVIDENCE INTO POLICY AND PRACTICE – ESCAPING THE DARK SIDE: Dr Roman Kislov, Manchester Metropolitan University, 22 April 2021

By Previous Seminars

Abstract:

This talk will reflect on the rise of knowledge brokering as a strategy for translating scientific research into healthcare policy and practice. Drawing on a 10-year programme of research conducted in a large-scale collaborative research partnership, it will explore different dimensions and types of knowledge brokering and discuss implications for evaluating its effectiveness. Particular attention will be paid to the ‘dark side’ of knowledge brokering and strategies that could be used to address it.

Biography:

Dr Roman Kislov is a Reader in Organisation Studies and Acting Head of Decent Work and Productivity Research Centre at Manchester Metropolitan University, an Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Health Policy and Organisation, University of Manchester, and an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation (AusHSI), Queensland University of Technology.

Roman conducts qualitative research on the processes and practices of knowledge mobilisation, with a particular interest in communities of practice, intermediary roles, organisational learning and implementation of change. His work crosses disciplinary boundaries between organisation studies, public administration and health services research. Roman’s work has recently appeared in Public Administration Review, Organization Studies, Public Administration, Implementation Science and BMJ Quality and Safety.

Roman is currently a Deputy Theme Lead for Implementation Science in the National Institute for Health Research Applied Research Collaboration (NIHR ARC) Greater Manchester—a large-scale partnership between universities, NHS providers and third-sector organisations aiming to produce research that responds to the needs of local health and care system across the region

 

HEALING AFTER HARM A RESTORATIVE APPROACH TO INCIDENTS: Jo Wailling, RN, The Diana Unwin Chair in Restorative Justice, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, 25 February 2021

By Previous Seminars

Abstract:

In 2002, the renowned patient safety advocate and former president of the Institute of Health Improvement, Sir Don Berwick, wrote of what he had learned about patient safety in his career. Perhaps Berwick’s most important insight was that that safety is fundamentally about people. Safety emerges from the unique encounter between the people who need services and those entrusted to deliver them.

Similarly, when incidents occur, people are harmed, and their relationships affected. If such harm is to be adequately addressed and safety enhanced, then wellbeing must be restored, and relationships rebuilt. This means that what happens after an incident is of equal importance to understanding how or why it occurred. It also means that safety needs to be conceived in a relational as well as a regulatory framework, with resilience being understood as the interplay between both elements.

While restorative justice is a nascent area of development in healthcare systems, as a distinctively relational and dialogical approach to preventing and responding to harm, the approach has the potential to fill an important gap in our current understandings of safety. This seminar will explore the potential of restorative philosophy and the associated practices in healthcare settings using examples from practice and research to illustrate the possibilities. The session will also discuss the evaluation of a major and internationally unprecedented project, which employed a restorative approach to address the harm caused to patients and professionals by the use of surgical mesh in New Zealand.

Biography:

Jo is a Registered Nurse, Research Fellow and Facilitator with the Diana Unwin Chair in Restorative Justice, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. She worked as a registered nurse in NHS critical care settings for thirteen years before moving to NZ and has over twenty years’ experience in clinical, professional, and government advisory roles. Jo leads the Chairs collaborations with health sector partners. A notable project is New Zealand’s restorative inquiry into harm from surgical mesh and she chairs a national collaborative for restorative approaches in healthcare. She is actively involved in international research collaborations and networks that promote restorative responses and resilient healthcare. Jo applies and researches restorative responses to harm from adverse events, moral injury, bullying and harassment and organisational culture. Her PhD is critically examining New Zealand’s restorative approach to surgical mesh harm within the context of the health system.

 

THE KING’S FUND – COMPASSIONATE LEADERSHIP FOR CULTURES OF HIGH QUALITY CARE: Professor Michael West, Lancaster University Management School, 10 December 2020

By Previous Seminars

Abstract:

The pandemic has triggered global tragedy, pain, fear, anxiety and darkness. Yet, at the darkest times there is an opportunity for the light of learning to stream in. In this presentation I will suggest that the three key areas of learning from this crisis for our health and care systems are compassionate leadership, team-working, and reflection. The seminar will address the question of how we can develop cultures of high quality, continually improving and compassionate care in the challenging circumstances we face in our health services and, at the same time, ensure the well-being and growth of those who provide that care?

Drawing on the evidence from our two reviews into doctors’ and nurses’ mental health and wellbeing across the UK, the seminar will provide practical guidance necessary to help us ensure that compassion, high quality and innovation are at the heart of health and care cultures.

The seminar will provide information not only the ‘what’ of the key elements of team and organisational elements for a positive culture but also the ‘how’. It will describe how we can help to create the conditions that ensure high-quality care cultures at national and local level. It will draw on the strategies being implemented across the four UK health and care systems to illustrate the key themes. Participants will have links to a wealth of open-access, evidence-based resources to enable them to support the transformation of health care teams and organisations.

Presentation slides available here